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Trefriw
Ty Mawr, Wybrant
Welsh Highland
Railway


Trefriw




Trefriw, which lies in the wooded Conway Valley, north west of Llanrwst, is a clustered hillside village made popular in the Victorian era when visitors took the strong iron and sulphur waters for such complaints as rheumatism and anaemia. The old bathouse and pumproom which now serves as a guest house, stand near the wells, where visitors can still buy the water.

At the Trefriw Woollen Mill visitors can see the weaving and hydro-electric turbines. The River Crafnant still provides its power. The mill and shop are open Monday - Friday, the shop is also open on Saturdays. The village has two inns, both of which serve food and there is also a restaurant and tea rooms.

Trefriw

Trefriw has an interesting history, Llywelyn the Great is known to have had a court there in the twelfth century. The Church of St. Mary was founded in the thirteenth century by Llywelyn the Great. Nearby Llanrychwyn Church, a highly characterful building, known locally as 'Llywelyn's Church' dates from the late eleventh century.



A walk at Trefriw


Llyn Crafnant



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